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Method of East Asian Classical Studies, 41st Seminar
A Platform for Rising Scholars (session 14)

Date
April 7th (Saturday), 2018, starting at 2:30 pm
Venue
Minami-sōgō Building, north building, fourth floor, room 4117, Yoshida Campus, Kyoto University
Speaker
BIAN Dongbo (Nanjing University)

Basic Information

Summary

Theme: Dongying jigulu: New Perspectives on the Relationship between Sinitic Japanese Literature and Classical Chinese Literature

Language of Lecture: Mandarin

Host

The Creation of a Next-Generation Hub for East Asian Classical Studies: Accelerating Research and Education through International Collaboration

Reports

Method of East Asian Classical Studies, 41st Seminar

A Platform for Rising Scholars (session 14)

 

Date and Time: April 7th (Saturday), 2018, starting at 2:30 pm

Venue: Minami-sōgō Building, north building, fourth floor, room 475, Yoshida Campus, Kyoto University

 

Scheduled events

 

Lecturer: Bian Dongbo (Nanjing University)

 

Summary:

 

              Dr. Bian Dongbo of Nanjing University presented a talk entitled “Dongying jigulu: New Perspectives on the Relationship between Sinitic Japanese Literature and Classical Chinese Literature,” in which he discussed issues relating to the use of Sinitic works written outside of continental China, as well as the study of Chinese classical literature, especially that produced during the Song dynasty. The audience consisted of about twenty scholars, including graduate students currently studying at Tokyo University, as well as students from Osaka University and Ritsumeikan University.

              Dr. Bian presentation consisted of three sections, namely: a working definition of Sinitic works written outside of Japan; current state of the field; the significance of using such materials. Regarding the last of these three sections, Dr. Bian explained the manner in which a number of Song-dynasty works, while presumed lost by continental Chinese scholars, had been printed and circulated in other countries, and how scholars working in these other countries helped further research into Song-dynasty continental literature. He further explained how research into these (non-continental) materials allows us not only to increase the corpus of Song-dynasty literature, but to develop new ways of looking at the field.

              During the question period, discussion centered around methods for distinguishing between superior and inferior copies of printed books (kanpon), as well as an edition of Shiren yuxie printed by Japanese monks dwelling in the Five Mountains.

              We would like to offer our gratitude to Dr. Bian for his extremely thought-provoking discussion, as well as to all the participants, whose remarks and questions made for a fruitful discussion.

 

Wang Yiran

Doctoral student at Kyoto University